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I lost a couple of fastening screws on my 34t ring, bought new screws, was about the replace them and discovered the ring holes do not align with the spider holes. Two match but the other two are off by a couple mm. The ring isn't bent, it still lays flush against the spider, but is it possible that by pedaling without all 4 screws, I managed to warp the ring out of round? It seems impossible a human could generate that much force.

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srchar [1566 posts] 1 week ago
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You'd be surprised how much force your legs can generate when paired with a 175mm lever - enough to lift around 100kg around 1,000m in around an hour. Inner chainrings aren't the meatiest things ever.

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Drinfinity [265 posts] 6 days ago
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Yes, I wouldn't be surprised that riding with only two chainring bolts bends something out of shape. Otherwise some weight weenie would come up with the two-arm chainset. 
 

Quite possible the remaining two bolts were not fully tight. There would be double the load trying to squish the bolts and ovalise the holes, as well as trying to ovalise the entire chainring.

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werics [5 posts] 6 days ago
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René Herse did/do a 3-arm, but it isn't at all a fair comparsion, as the BCD is something tiny.

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Drinfinity [265 posts] 6 days ago
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I'd never seen René Herse before, they look spectacular! Three chainrings all mounted on the same three bolts.

 

https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop/components/cranks/rh-tandem-triple-crank/

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fukawitribe [2892 posts] 6 days ago
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Drinfinity wrote:

I'd never seen René Herse before

Jan Heine / Compass Cycles as was.